ginger juice

How to make ginger juice | themusicianwhocooks.com
 
I thought I’d occasionally share ideas for staples that I keep in our kitchen and use nearly every day. One of my favorites is ginger juice. Spicy, pungent, great for digestion and in cold and flu tonics… I use it so often that it became a chore I needed to simplify. So I came up with this idea of how to always have the flavor of ginger ready to go. There’s really no recipe here, only a few descriptive steps. Be sure you have a pair of protective plastic gloves to wear while working with the ginger, especially if you have skin that reacts strongly to handling spicy foods. I purchased a box of disposable nitrile gloves which keep me from dealing with burning and irritated hands anytime I prep a bunch of ginger. You’ll also need a powerful blender such as a Vitamix to purée the ginger, which is one tough root.

How to make ginger juice | themusicianwhocooks.com
 
Put on a pair of plastic gloves. Start with one large or two medium “hands” of ginger. Break the “hand” into smaller pieces, and using a spoon, scrape as much of the the skin off as possible. Don’t worry about getting every little piece of skin in the hard-to-reach crevices off, but get it as clean as you can. Once most of the skin is removed, cut any pieces larger than 3 inches into smaller pieces. Throw all the pieces into your high-powered blender. Start blending at a lower speed until the larger pieces are broken up, and then increase the speed to high, tamping the ginger down as needed to keep it circulating through the blades until it is ground to a pulp.
 
How to make ginger juice | themusicianwhocooks.com
 
Scoop the pulp from the blender into a muslin-lined strainer positioned over a large glass or stainless steel bowl. Gather the edges of the muslin together, creating a bag with the ginger purée in the center. Gently squeeze the bag over the strainer into the bowl until all the liquid is removed from the pulp. Transfer the juice to a small glass storage container. To store the juice, I love using half-pint wide-mouth mason jars, which are small enough to hold only what you need to use for a few days in one jar, while freezing the rest in another. When you’re done, what you’ll have left is a tightly compacted piece of fibrous pulp, and…
 
How to make ginger juice | themusicianwhocooks.com
 
…bright, fresh ginger juice, ready to go, whenever you need it. The juice can also be frozen and thawed for later use.
 

ginger juice
 
If you love ginger and use it daily, make this juice so you have its flavor ready to go when you need it
Author:
Recipe type: spices
Ingredients
  • 1 large or 2 medium "hands" of fresh ginger
  • Plastic gloves (disposable or other)
  • Small metal spoon (a grapefruit spoon with little teeth on the sides is my favorite, but any thin-edged, sturdy metal spoon will work)
  • High-powered blender
  • Large (1-foot x 1-foot square) piece of unbleached muslin or cheesecloth
  • Medium strainer
  • Glass or stainless steel bowl
  • Two small half pint mason jars for storage in refrigerator and freezer
Instructions
  1. Put on a pair of plastic gloves.
  2. Start with one large or two medium "hands" of ginger.
  3. Break the "hand" into smaller pieces, and using a spoon, scrape as much of the skin off as possible. Don't worry about getting every little piece of skin in the hard-to-reach crevices, but get it as clean as you can.
  4. Once most of the skin is removed, cut any pieces larger than 3 inches into smaller pieces.
  5. Throw all the pieces into your high-powered blender.
  6. Start blending at a lower speed until the larger pieces are broken up, and then increase the speed to high, tamping the ginger down as needed to keep it circulating through the blades until it is ground to a pulp.
  7. Scoop the pulp from the blender into a muslin-lined strainer positioned over a large glass or stainless steel bowl.
  8. Gather the edges of the muslin together, creating a bag with the ginger purée in the center. Gently squeeze the bag over the strainer into the bowl until all the liquid is removed from the pulp. What you'll have left in the bag when you're done is a tightly compacted piece of fibrous pulp.
  9. Transfer the juice to a small mason jar. Refrigerate the amount you'll use in a few days in one jar, and freeze the rest in another jar.

 

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